Everyday Feminism

We can all take action, however small.  Small actions add up.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

― Margaret Mead

A tiny change today brings a dramatically different tomorrow.

– Richard Bach, One

There are many many excuses for not doing things, but there’s one huge overriding reason why we should.  The world is unfair and unequal and without action it will not change.  It is not in the interest of half the world’s population for things to change.  And when you include the women employed in industries which oppress women, the number who have financial interest in maintaining gender inequality increases.

Think of the people involved in fashion, beauty, magazines who spend so much time telling us and showing us that we are lesser citizens.  That we have to work harder, show up painted and adorned before we can take part in society.  It is a tool of oppressors.  And the more they think we are at risk of fighting back, the louder their message will be. If we start to question, they will amp up the volume.  Send out more and more messages which crush self worth.  Instead of rising together as a movement, we are beaten into our own, individual battles with ourselves.

Think of the power we have that we use to oppress ourselves and others, what if we used that differently?  If instead of repeating my own messages of self hate, what if I turned that out and used that voice to bring down the patriarchy?

Everyday Feminism: A small, everyday act which contributes to the aims of feminism and/or supports women.

I ran a workshop about this at a conference yesterday and some of the ideas we discussed were:

  • Replace gossip magazines in waiting rooms with magazines about something be it science, wildlife, cooking, writing, photography, anything with substance
  • Sticker over sexist graffiti, adverts etc
  • Use twitter and facebook to complain to companies but also to congratulate companies who are carrying out good practice
  • Boycott products with sexist advertising or packaging
  • Turn magazines with offensive covers round in shops
  • Mix up magazines, books and clothes in shops where they are labelled as “mens” and “womens”
  • Compliment someone on something other than their appearance or compliment them about about something different to the norm – great haircut in a fab shade of grey etc
  • Reframe problematic language
  • Tell people you are a feminist
  • Leave leaflets in books, public places, blu-taked on toilet doors
  • Be mindful of our own negative thoughts and behaviours
  • Don’t belittle yourself – “I’m just a…” “Can I just add something small to this debate…” etc
  • Do not apologise for yourself

If you have any other ideas, let me know.

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