What I’m reading 

The Books of Pellinor by Alison Croggon

A five book series plus a prequel, these tell the story of a servant girl who discovers there is more to her past than she knew.  It’s hard to explain what this series is about without spoiling things… Needless to say it has a strong female character and is set in a different, magical world.

Angel of Storms series by Trudi Canavan

I’ve just started the second in this series.  I would have leapt into it sooner but the kindle version was still £9.99 for the ebook when I finished the first book.  A bit of impatient waiting and it went down to £4.99 plus an affordable audio version.

This series spans numerous magical worlds and includes a person who was made into a book.  Once a young sorcerer-bookbinder, Vella was transformed into a book to be used as a powerful tool by one of the greatest sorcerers of history. Since then she has been collecting information from everyone who touches her.  Whilst there are numerous interesting human characters, I do think Vella remains my favourite!

Scapegoat by Katharine Quamby

wp-1473151983019.jpgI know I mentioned this before but I’d only just started it then and it definetly deserves a second mention.  It details a brief history of attitudes towards disabled people and then looks at the situation today.  Quamby looks at the ineffective, and rather late to the game, disabilty hate crime legislation as well as detailing horrific cases.  Whilst she inevitabily focuses on the most extreme hate crimes, the sheer volume of cases paints a painful picture of how some people view disability.  It was published in 2011 so remains a fairly current portrayal of the UK today.
Read with something else on the go.  Look after yourself as you read it.  It’s a hardhitting shocking book but one which must be read.

Independent lives by Jenny Morris 

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Although this was published in 1993, it has helped me to understand more about the history of independent living and the move away from institutionalisation in the UK.  Unfortunately a lot of the issues around care which are raised in the book are still present today.

In order to create and develop a successful, empowering care system, we must look at the past and reflect on successes and failures.

78 Degrees of Wisdom by Rachel Pollack

This, I think, is the only tarot book I’ve read (apart from deck specific guides).  It was orginially published as two books, one looking at the major arcana and one at the minor.  This is obvious when you start on the second section as it does repeat some of the first.  However, Pollack provides detailed information about each card including symbology, mythology and application for readings.  It’s been described as the bible of tarot and is regularly featured on must read tarot book lists.  Compared to other tarot books I’ve flicked through, she seems to go into more depth and provides the reader with a deeper understanding of the symbology which will inevitably deepen their reading of tarot.

Mark Hearld’s Workbook


This is not so much reading as admiring.  I love Hearld’s work and his Workbook provides a great balance of information and imagery.  If you happen to be in York, do check out the Lumber Room at York Art Gallery.  It was curated by Hearld and features some of his work as well as interesting and intriguing objects and artwork.


Magazine wise

Alongside a few books, I always have a magazine on the go.  At the moment I’m enjoying bitch, flow, oh comely, national geographic and mslexia.  What can I say, I have diverse interests!

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