Connecting with nature when you’re stuck in the house

I love nature.  But I am limited to wheelchair friendly parts of it.  And only when it’s not raining.  And my pain levels and energy levels further restrict things.  And if I want to see nature that’s not in my immediate neighbourhood, I am reliant on friends and carers and my manual wheelchair.  Which all feels very limiting and stifling.

There are some great places to get into nature with the wheelchair.  York has a number of nice parks, a riverside path etc.  There is a nature reserve just north of the city (Moorlands), St Nicks Fields (I’ve not been yet) and within an hour there is Potteric Carr (I don’t think I’ve blogged about that yet but my review is over on Euan’s Guide).

However, if you can let go of the idea of what “being in nature” looks like, you can experience it from home, or even your bed.

For me, for a long time, being in nature meant being outside, being away from people, being in uncultivated, un-manicured space.  It meant sitting for a while breathing in fresh air.  It meant walking and getting off the beaten track.

I’m starting to adjust that idea.  In line with my word of the year, I am trying to notice the little things and that includes nature.  I do think you have to attune yourself to notice things, train yourself almost.

“I like it when a flower or a little tuft of grass grows through a crack in the concrete. It’s so fuckin’ heroic.”

― George Carlin

But surely you need to be able to get out of bed?

Not necessarily.

Think about where your bed is in relation to the window.  I  miss my old flat for one reason only – from the bed, at night, I could see the stars and the moon through the cracks in the blinds.  My current bedroom doesn’t allow that but the bed is opposite the window so if I’m in bed with the curtains open, I can see a slither of sky, a few tree branches and the sky (and birds and clouds) reflected in the windows of the drs surgery.  Sure, it’s not the same as being outside, but seeing a flock of birds head over is still a great moment.

Could a bird table be placed outside your bedroom window?  It’s not always an option but if you can, it would be great for encouraging nature to come to you.  Or plants placed strategically so you can see them from your bed?

Think similarly if you have a chair you spend a lot of time in.  When I’m not in bed, most of my day is spent in my rise recliner chair.  It’s angled towards the tv, but also towards the window so movement outside can catch me eye.  Just yesterday morning, I looked out my window and a wagtail flew onto the road, pecked around and flew off with some food in it’s beak.  I didn’t even have to leave my chair.  I’ve just glanced out the window and there’s a beautiful golden winter light catching the bricks of houses with it’s glow.

Other ideas

A gentle and effortless connectedness to nature helps give meaningful purpose to our lives, improves well being and allows reflection.  Establishing this connection can be facilitated by taking time to appreciate ordinary things and to engage more fully with nature.  Life is now rapid and we rarely pause to appreciate the moment.

Miles Richardson

Obviously what you are able to do will be different to me, and I can’t do everything I’m suggesting but I wanted to collate a collection of different ways you can connect to nature whilst being unable to go outside.

  • Connect with the seasons:
    • seasonal eating
    • seasonal creative projects – i am taking photos of the same tree each season for a year
    • seasonal celebrations – think harvest, think may day, hot cross buns in spring
  • Indoor gardening
  • Read magazines etc about nature and wildlife.  I like Wildlife magazine and National Geographic.  These have the advantage of being relevant to the season you’re in.
  • Read books.  There’s been a boom in nature books in the last few years so you’ve got plenty to choose from.  I’ve just bought Needwood by Miles Richardson.  Amazon describes it as “a celebration of the joy that can be extracted from ordinary things in the natural world”.  It is split into sections of time and my plan is to read it slowly over the year, in line with when he wrote each section.
  • Keep a book to hand to help you identify the birds etc that you see.
  • Watch things online or dvds about nature – there are plenty of David Attenborough programmes out there!  For epic wildlife, I like the Yellowstone series.  But perhaps more in-keeping with the theme of this post would be something looking at a more microscopic world, eg the secret life of plants.  For close to home (in the UK), maybe springwatch and its seasonal relatives?
  • Webcams can give you a view of the world that you wouldn’t get to see otherwise.  As well as zoos, places like national parks etc often have cameras you can access from their websites.  Apparently webcams are available specifically for avid bird watchers so you could use one to enjoy what goes on in your own garden.
  • Listen to recordings of bird song or rain or the ocean.
  • Enlist the help of others.  Although it can feel like you’re missing out, asking friends and family to take photos and bring in twigs, flowers, leaves, stones, shells, feathers etc can help you to feel more surrounded by nature.  Pay close attention to the objects – what do they smell like, feel like, look like.  Get to know the pebble, notice it’s intricate details, it’s subtle colours etc.
  • Notice the changing weather and how the light changes in your room, maybe even hang a crystal so you get rainbows dancing on your walls.
  • Cloudspotting is something I want to try again.  If you can, maybe take photos of clouds?
  • If, like me, you’re often awake in the early hours, listen out for birds waking up.  Can you identify any bird calls?
  • Follow nature accounts on social media.
  • Open your window so you can feel the breeze and smell the rain.
  • Surround your home with pictures of nature.
  • Creative projects about nature – photography, writing etc.
  • Decorate your room with pebbles, shells, driftwood, bowls of fircones etc.
  • Use incense or candles to create the smell of your favourite flowers.
  • Maybe get a fish tank.
  • If you can get to your front door, look out at the stars, breath in the air, feel the rain on your skin.
  • If you go out for appointments, look out for nature then.

I’d love to hear what other ideas people have for bringing nature inside.

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