Reading with hand pain

It’s come up a few times over the last few months so I thought I’d share what I have learnt about reading with hand pain.

This is just my experience so if anyone can add any other ideas that’d be great!

  • Get a kindle – it took me a long time to accept the idea of not being able to hold a book in my hands and enjoy the physicality of it but once I got my kindle my reading life vastly improved!  Mine is an old one, it was second hand and I got it to see if I’d get on with it.  Amazon do sell refurbished kindles and obviously there are other e-readers available!  Look at the weight of them and if possible, hold one before you buy it.  Mine is a very no frills version.  It literally just does books but it means that it’s a lot lighter than some options.  Also think about how you turn the pages – is it a button or a touch sensitive screen, different things will work better for different people but it’s definitely something to factor in.
  • If you’re going with Amazon then look into whispersync. If an audio version is available, you can buy it cheaper when you have the ebook.  This means you can flick between reading and listening. I struggled to get into audiobooks but found this combined approach really helped.  You can flick through the ebook to find your place if you fall asleep which makes a huge difference to me!
  • Audiobooks themselves are another option.
  • Check if your local library offers ebooks and audiobooks.  These can be downloaded from sites such as overdrive and are great if you can’t get to the library.  Note, last time I checked this doesn’t work on kindles but is great on tablets and probably on smart phones.  There are other electronic lending libraries for disabled people eg Listening Books and Calibre.
  • Not really a reading tip but Kindle and Audible both do deals of the day and there are numerous websites where you can download classics for free.
  • If you want to read a physical book (and some books are still not available as ebooks), then a few things you might want to consider are:
    • break the spine – I know some people find this really difficult but it does mean the book stays open more easily
    • prop the book open – I use my phone to hold the pages open, you can get gadgets which do this but my phone seems to work ok for me!
    • try and stick with paperbacks – they are lighter and you can break the spine
    • thinner books are easier to hold as are smaller books
    • don’t hold the book up, lay it on a table, tray or your knee.  I always used to read laying down on my side holding the book but I’ve not been able to do that for years.  If you do want to lay on your side and read, maybe find a way to prop the book up using a pillow or a teddy or a book stand!  Be careful about your posture when you’re reading, especially if you have pain elsewhere eg I can’t put my book on my lap because it then triggers shoulder and neck pain.
    • flick between reading something physical and something electronic.  I always have numerous books on the go and that means I can choose what is best for my hands, or what is possible, when I’m wanting to read
    • think about what time of day you’re trying to read – for me, nighttime is harder so if I’m reading a physical book, it has to be during the day
    • adopt slow reading – I can only read a couple of pages of physical books at a time which, as an avid and fairly fast reader, I used to find really frustrating.  I’ve since made my peace with this (which is one reason I always have an ebook on the go as well) and I savour the books I’m reading instead of devouring them.  I also only read fiction on my kindle as otherwise I overdo it because I’m caught up in the story.
    • as hard as it might be, limit how long you read a physical book for.  Set a timer if you need to.  If you’re not familiar with pacing, look into it.  It’s essentially the idea that you do a little bit of something, take a little break, then go back to it rather than pushing through, overdoing it and ending up in agony.  That small break makes a lot of difference.
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