Do all disabled people think the same?

Clearly the answer is no.  But this is an interesting video which asks some interesting questions and I wanted to share my responses.  I realise this comes on the back of another blog post where I respond to questions but I’m not anticipating that this will become a trend.

Am I offended by the word disabled?

I know this is something that bothers some people, and different places have different preferred language.  For example in the UK, we tend to speak of disabled people whereas in the US, people with disabilities seems to be the preferred option.

Anyway, back to the question.  I have no issue with the word disabled.  It describes my situation and is vastly better than some of the alternatives such as differently abled or special.  I do think it’s important to remember that disability, or being disabled, is more than just wheelchairs though.  It covers physical, mental and learning disabilities and I do think that the symbol of a person in a wheelchair is too narrow.

Does this country provide enough resources for the disabled community?

It doesn’t matter where in the world you are, the answer to this is no.  Of course some countries are doing a better job than others but disability is generally underfunded, under-acknowledged and misunderstood.  There are still so many taboos and stereotypes out there and these damage opportunities for disabled people.

Are most people ignorant about my disability?

For my particular disability, things are getting better.  There is more information about there about my condition.  In terms of using a wheelchair, there is a lot of ignorance.  People still think if you use a wheelchair, you can’t stand or walk at all.  This is the case for some people but many of us can get out of our chairs.  Related to that is the idea that disability looks a certain way and anyone who doesn’t fit that image must therefore be faking.

Do I appreciate it when people offer me help?

I was in town once, in my wheelchair outside a shop waiting for my friend.  I was trying to put my coat on.  Someone came up behind me, I hadn’t heard them, the first I knew was when they grabbed my coat and started trying to help me.  I do understand it was meant well, but it could easily have led to my shoulder dislocating.  Please, do ask if you think I need help, but don’t just thrust it upon me.

Also, if you do want to help and have asked, listen to me as I probably know how best you can help me.

Is dating difficult?

Yes.  Dating requires being vulnerable and that can involve another layer of vulnerability when you have a disability.  There are also all the should I shouldn’t I’s.  You want people to see past the disability but also, especially if you’re short on energy, you want to meet up with people who aren’t going to turn out to be prejudiced.  And there are a lot of people out there who don’t see disabled people as sexual beings, people who wouldn’t consider dating a disabled person and people who assume that dating a disabled person means you become their carer.

Have I felt like a burden?

Yes.  In general, my friends don’t make me feel like a burden but strangers do all the time.  Whether it’s when I’m asking to squeeze past in my wheelchair or need a hand moving chairs in a cafe, there does seem to be two reactions.  The people who think nothing of being helpful and those other people who really make you know that they have had to go out of their way for me.

Would I change my disability?

This is an impossible question.  I would love to not be in pain 24/7 but I also wouldn’t be me if I didn’t have my disability.  Without it, I have no idea what my life would look like.  I’d be on such a different track and whilst that’s intriguing, there are things in my life that I really value that wouldn’t be with me without my disability.  I wouldn’t have had as much time to write and do art and learn about tarot and astrology.  I certainly wouldn’t know as much as I do about nature.

Am I living a fulfilled life?

When read with the above question, I think the answer has to be yes.  It’s a different life but it’s one that I have put time and effort into creating.  And even without my physical disability, I’d still have had to overcome my mental health issues.  I know what I need to do in order to feel fulfilled.  I learn, I read, I think, I create, I go out and I chill out.  Retiring meant I had to figure this out, it was that or living in a groundhog day world where I did the same nothingness every day.

Goals, aims and ambitions when you’re retired/ill

This time of year there is a lot of talk about planning and setting goals and aims and thinking about what you want to do with your life.

But it’s not so straightforward when you’re ill and/or retired early or unable to work.  A lot of this talk is about career development or changes.  And if you aren’t working and know you will not work again this is irrelevant.

Some people may be able to manage a small online shop.  This was originally my plan; to sell cards, just to give me a bit of purpose and direction.  But that has been ruled out – any money I would make from that would go straight towards my care which I find very frustrating.  I am realistic enough to know that I’d not earn much from selling cards but the personal satisfaction of having someone like my work enough to pay for it would be helpful for my mental health.  And I know I wouldn’t be selling so many cards that it would affect my health.

Other life goals people have include buying a house – that’s out the question financially – or having children – out the question from a health point of view – or meeting their significant other – I have little enough energy for me let alone someone else.  Travelling the world would be a great dream to have but its completely unfeasible financially.

Realistically, there are days when getting out of bed is an achievement.  It can very hard to think even a few months ahead when you have chronic illness or mental health issues.  The future is so unknown and that makes it very difficult to think long term or in terms of ambitions and life goals.

Don’t get me wrong, there are things I enjoy doing on a day to day basis and I have a few longer term projects on the go.  But if someone asked my what I want to do with my life, or where I want to be in five years time, or what my life might look like in 2026, I have no idea.

I know it’s still early days with my retirement and that I am adjusting and getting used to it.  I hope that towards the end of 2017 I will have something helpful to say, but for now, if you’re feeling overwhelmed by the pressure of having life plans etc, know that you aren’t alone.

Carriage clocks* and more

Retiring at 29 wasn’t part of my life plan. Not that I really have a life plan. But, like most people, I assumed I would spend my adult life working and, given my pain and the ever increasing retirement age, I’d have to leave on ill health. But i was expecting that to be in my 50s or so.

DSCN1009 MO
not an accurate picture of my retirement…

But increased levels of pain and fatigue have sped things up. I’ve done all i can to keep working :

  • I’ve had numerous access to work assessments and been provided with lots of helpful equipment and taxis to and from work
  • I reduced my hours to four days a week
  • I tried working at home
  • I reduced my hours to three days a week
  • I looked at spreading my hours across the week, more days but less hours
  • I’ve carefully organised my leave to ensure I got regular time off
  • I tried to get the employer to understand how their partly inaccessible building made my day so much more difficult

But even then I still couldn’t make it through my three day working week. At the end of a day in work I would get in, collapse into a chair and struggle to give my carers coherent instructions. And I would spend all my none working days recovering from work. And there were parts of my job, such as phone calls to the public, that I wasn’t comfortable doing when I had taken increased pain relief. As well as the physical issues, the mental exhaustion and fog made it hard to think and assess situations as fast as I know I can.

So, in early February I put in my application for retirement and went off sick. It’s taken a lot longer than it should but I finally have a leaving date – 20th may.  I will also receive some pension as well, details not yet known, which will help me financially.

I have had numerous people tell me “Ooh, I couldn’t do that.. I’d get bored..” and have come up against medical people who have been less than supportive and haven’t even attempted to understand my circumstances.

An illustation: I saw a pain doctor for the first time a few months back, I normally deal with a lovely woman who is all about maximising quality of life.  This guy may have read my notes, but quite probably hadn’t.  He asked what medication I was on and I went through it and went on to explain that I was hoping to reduce some of the morphine because I was stopping work.  He said “from a pain management point of view we would not recommend this”.  I started to justify my decision but he didn’t want to know.  He kept repeating his statement, even when I started to cry.

This isn’t an easy decision.  It’s not something I’m taking lightly.  I haven’t done it on a whim.  I have tried all the options available to me and cannot find a workable solution.  And this is with the most supportive manager and team that you can imagine.  If I can’t do it with them, I can’t do it anywhere.

The other standard reaction is jealousy.  Which I find difficult because I don’t want to be doing this.  The rest of my life is stretched out in front of me with nothing in it.  Literally, I have no plans this year except hospital appointments and a trip to Oxford (this has a lot to do with the door and carer situation but the point is there).

I’ve not worked in three months and, even before that, I knew I needed to be careful because this was a risky time for my mental health. Again, things haven’t been helped by the door opener not being in place making me housebound and not getting all my care hours.

Up until a few months ago I had worked or been studying or both all my life.  I worked for my dad (a farmer) from an early age, basically when I could start being helpful; I started working Saturdays as soon as I could (16); I worked full time in the summer holidays when I was in sixth form and uni; I had one painful month job hunting when I left uni and then moved straight from job to job till now.  So not working is a HUGE change.

So… what next?

I am hoping to find a course to start in September on writing, craft, humanities…  I’ve got lots of interests so should be able to find something to go to for a couple of hours a week.  And hopefully I’ll meet other people who aren’t working the traditional 9-5 jobs.  Because almost everyone I know is, and that means I can’t see them during the week.  I’ve also looked at online courses through futurelearn and coursera.

I already know i need to do something creative most days and I’ve realised I need to do something intellectual on a regular basis so i came up with a list of things I need to keep doing on a daily-ish basis to help me cope with retirement:

  1. Something creative – art journalling, working on some of my creative projects or wanderlust activities, writing etc
  2. Something intellectual – a course, a non fiction book, a crossword
  3. Something outside – when the door is fixed of course…
  4. Something which helps me check in with myself – tarot, art journal, friday morning check ins (which I keep meaning to blog about)
  5. Something restful – because I am still ill and still need to look after myself and give myself enough down time

What I would really like is for people to suggest more ideas for these areas and tell me how you cope with being off work, whether its long term sickness, retirement or not having a job.


  • engraved carriage clocks, pocket watches etc seem popular retirement gifts – you’re no longer working, you’re probably in your last years, have a time keeping device to count them down…?  I do not want a clock or watch for my retirement!