Sex when you have a disability

I was flicking through instagram earlier today and came across an amazing post by @wheely_good_time.  It was a group of spoonie sex tips (learn about the spoon theory if you don’t know what a spoonie is) and I loved them!  I instantly bounced them up into my stories and saved them.  They are practical tips and reminders with a nice dose of humour and I love that.

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A collection of spoonie sex tips that you all gave on the collab I made with @frankietastic ✌️&❤️ Eva xx ID: 10 images showing “Spoonie Sex Tips”: 1. Communication (talk before, during and after sex about what worked and what didn’t) 2. You don’t have to (we have to get over feeling guilty saying no when we’re unable to have sex because of our health) 3. Talk to someone (your physical therapist or a sex therapist) 4. Sex aids (vibrators, dildos, sex swings and flesh lights) 5. Provisions (have water and sweets on hand) 6. Positions (experiment to find what’s right for you, start by spooning) 7. Instead of sex (not just penetration – oral, masturbation, voyeurism, massage, porn, tantric, kissing, dirty talk, instructing) 8. Spoonie support (mobility aids and strategically placed pillows) 9. Dull the pain (physical pain – not emotional with ibuprofen, warm baths, also alcohol or weed – but set limits when sober) 10. Take it slow (it’s not a race) #WheelyGoodTime #StillDisabled #StillSick #Art #Quote #QOTD #Disability #DisabilityAwareness #Disabled #ChronicIllness #Spoonie #Disabilities #Accessibility #ChronicPain #DisabilityRights #SpoonieLife #DisabilityAdvocate #DisabledPeopleAreHot #TheBarriersWeFace #AbleismExists #DisaBodyPosi #BabeWithAMobilityAid

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I especially like tip 6 about positions which suggests starting with spooning!  And I think positioning is something that is really important with some disabilities or chronic health conditions.  Do you feel better when you’re sitting or laying?  Is your wheelchair the most comfortable place for you?  Incorporate that into your sex life!  Do you find having your legs elevated on a cushion helps you feel better?  Well that’s great because it can position you for better sex!  Use the motion of a wheelchair or the many positions of a riser recliner in your favour.  Research positions together and you’ll find out what you both like.

“Use a powerchair? Explore the tilt function to get your body in a comfortable position for self-exploration. Depending on your mobility, explore the sensation of shifting or rubbing your weight on the seat. Go for a jiggly, bumpy ride on a rough surface. Play around with the position of your belt and/or straps if you want to see what light bondage feels like.”
ACSEXE+

I’ve talked on my blog about communication before but I want to reiterate that I think a safe word is important. You need a way to distinguish between moans of pleasure and the screams of “shit my hip just dislocated”.

Sex isn’t a race.  Quick sex can be fun and has it’s place but we are so often shown this idea of destination sex.  Sex which is just about penetration and anything else that’s happening is just to get to that goal.  Sex without penetration can be more creative. It can take an afternoon and go in fits and starts as energy allows.  You can take a breather and just lay there together.  These things are ok and can create intimacy.

“In the movies, couples are always portrayed as being flawlessly sexy and romantic. In reality… people get cramps. They hit their head. Their stomachs make weird noises. They pull a muscle. And when you live with chronic pain, things are, truthfully, even more likely to go a bit awry. Don’t be afraid to laugh with your partner – it may even bring you closer together.”
– 
The Mighty

I’ve said before but think about timing.  I know that there is this idea out there of spontaneous sex that often happens after bedtime but in reality, we could be having better sex if we listened to our bodies.  When are you most awake?  When do you feel at your best?  If that’s sunday lunch time then make the most of it!  And if your bed is like mine and full of random stuff – positioning pillows, books, bears… – then move them before you get started.  That way you don’t have to stop midway to make things more comfortable.  It also means that if, like me you are fed overnight, you don’t have to add in navigating extra tubes.

Play to your individual strengths.  If one of you is physically stronger, make them do more of the physical work.  You can give back in other ways – dirty talk, creating fantasies, excellent playlists etc.

Anyway, this post was mostly to link to the cool instagram post and to revive the conversation around sex and disability.

And remember that sex releases wonderful hormones which can help with pain!

Related reading:

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EDS and drinking, take two

Four or so years ago I wrote a blog post about EDS and drinking and felt it was time for an update!

What are the issues with EDS and drinking…

  • you may not be able to swallow or have a limited swallow.  In my case I can drink some things and not others.  Generally when people can’t swallow liquids very well they are advised to try thicker drinks. In my case this concept is reversed, I can’t drink thick drinks but can do water and squash and thin liquids.  I also can’t drink anything with sugar in.  No idea why this is the case but wanted to mention in case it helps someone else identify a pattern in their own swallowing.
  • you may not be able to lift a drinking vessel
  • you may not be able to open a bottle with your hands or a sports cap with your teeth
  • you may have a tendency to spill or drop drinks
  • you may need to drink more than the average person to manage POTS

What are the solutions?

Contigo Autoseal are still my go to for hot drinks and I still haven’t had a problem with the flask mentioned in my first post about this subject!  They have a couple of designs so it’s worth having a think about what will be best for you.  I find the ones without handles easier but the ones with handles do have locks for added security.  The button you press to open the mouth bit is fairly easy to press but not so easy it’ll get pressed in your bag.  You can also get a replacement lid if you ever need to so you won’t need to throw the whole thing away.

Note of caution: your drink will stay hot for hours. If you want to be able to drink it soon, add some cold water!

Straw wise, you’ve now got a range of options which is amazing!  There is lots of advice out there now in response to the straw bans but I find this from @rollwthepunches particularly helpful:

straw

Hopefully it will help you think through your options.  Personally I use metal straws for cold drinks and I have a little pouch that I take out with one in so my bag doesn’t get wet after use.  I also take out straws which are made of plastic designed for hot drinks, a bit like these from Serephina’s Kitchen.  Note, don’t use the metal ones for hot drinks!!!

I’ve tried glass straws and liked them for drinking wine – it felt classier than using plastic or metal – but my carers ended up breaking them all.  All of these can be hard to clean if you have hand issues so do consider that as well.  Some can go in the dishwasher and this might be something to think about if you don’t have someone who can help you clean them.

When it comes to cold drinks, I get through ridiculous amounts of squash and diet fizzy drinks in a day.  I’m talking 5 to 6 litres a day.  Obviously this means I don’t leave the house without a bottle and that bottle is one from Hydrate for Health.  It pops in the side pocket of my wheelchair bag and the long straw means it reaches round the chair and clips onto my coat or skirt or whatever.  Without it, I’d be asking my carers to open a drink every two seconds…  I also use it overnight.  It hooks onto the trolley by my bed and means I can easily drink when in bed.  I can even drink laying down, all I have to do is move my arm!  You can also buy replacement bits which is great – I have two bottles and have had them for years now but from time to time I need a new clip or straw and I like that I can get them separately.

At the other end of the size spectrum I have a Contingo Autoseal water bottle which is a mere 300ml and has been to Cambodia and back with me.  When I was on the plane, I got it refilled with water and hence didn’t have to bother with plastic cups.  I have absolutely no issues with it and, like my flask, have had it for a number of years now!

During the day I like to drink fizzy drinks and the hydrate for health doesn’t really work for that so I use those plastic cups with lids and straws.  You can find them in bargain home stores and have grown in popularity over the last few years so are fairly easy to find.  If you don’t know what I’m talking about, look at this one from amazon but note that you can normally get them for less than £3.

Safe Sip drink covers can another great product and can be used on wine glasses! They are easy to use and small enough to carry with you if you’re going out.  Pop them in a little pouch with your straw!

A life of pain

There are a lot of posts online about how long it has taken for people to be diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS). I was thinking about joining in as it is the helpful way to raise awareness of both the condition and the struggle that people have to be diagnosed.

However, I don’t know when I first became aware of my symptoms. For me, they were normal. I remember coming out of exams in school surrounded by friends who were telling me how much their hands hurt. My hands hurts so badly that my handwriting was virtually illegible, my pain was through the roof and I hadn’t been able to write everything I wanted to. I assumed my pain with the same as theirs and that I was weak, overly sensitive and over-dramatic. I didn’t know my pain wasn’t normal.  I didn’t know what I was experiencing wasn’t ok.

I was told over and over again that I was useless at sports and PE because I was unhealthy and unfit.  I assumed the pains shooting through my legs were because of this.  It never clicked that it was or could be something else.  I restarted dance lessons when I was 12 because I wanted to get healthier.  I quickly lost track of the number of times my ankles rolled and twisted and sprained.  We did a week of performances in the summer of 2000.  I danced every night on a strapped up, sprained ankle.  I went to school and walked around as if everything was normal.  Because for me it was.

My friend’s mum was horrified and suggested I try this and that to reduce the pain.  I was used to a mother who glossed over these things.  To have someone treat my pain like it was legitimate and a big deal was weird.  But sprained ankles come and sprained ankles go and after all, this was an intense week – I was performing every night for a full week and walking round school and walking home.  All of this factors came together to explain why this particular pain was so bad.

As I got older, I still carried the baggage of being dismissed, invalidated and told I was in pain because I was unfit.  It took breaking down in tears with my then partner because of the pain in my hands before I really started to realise that this wasn’t normal.  That people didn’t go around in pain day after day.  That people didn’t get shin splints from a short walk.  That writing notes in lectures shouldn’t leave me in agony.  I had lived with the pain for up to twenty years before I realised this.

I don’t know when I first noticed my pain.  I don’t know when it first became a problem.  All I do know is that by the time I was 22, I had finally realised this wasn’t normal.  This was the start of my journey towards a diagnosis.

Unfortunately, the first step on this journey involved a rheumatologist telling me I was hypermobile but it wasn’t a problem, that I was experiencing growing pains and that I would grow out of it.  He couldn’t understand why I burst into tears.

I was living in agony, I had realised that this wasn’t ok but here he was telling me that I was fine.  I spent the next couple of years in a weird grey space, not quite sure if I was overreacting to my pain, not quite sure if I was being dramatic and not quite sure if I was just overly sensitive.

I am now 32 and I know that my pain is real, I have a diagnosis and I have pain medication.  But I still ask myself whether I’m faking it or not.

Chronic pain and the cycle of grief

Like any major change in life, coming to terms with a chronic illness takes time and you will almost certainly move through the cycle of grief.  You will end up taking steps forward and backwards and will experience each step differently at different times in your life.

Shock and denial

Under the shock and denial stage, we find a few different phases that you might be in. It might be that moment symptoms start to show, when you realise that this isn’t going away or when you get a diagnosis.

I don’t remember how I felt when my symptoms started to show as it was so very long ago but at some stage I realised that the pain I was experiencing wasn’t normal and that took quite a bit of getting my head round – why had it taken 20 years of my life to discover this?  I then also had a lot of baggage around being ill, being told i was making it up, being told to stop being dramatic etc and this did, and still does, affect how i feel/think about my pain.  Because of all of this, I don’t think I really went through the shock and denial stage, I went through a stage of feeling validated instead.

Once you have a diagnoses there tends to be a couple of ways you can feel, or both at once.  If you’ve been trying to get a diagnosis for a long time and are fairly sure you know what’s wrong, then it can come as a relief.  Especially if you’ve been told time and time again that it’s all in your head, you’re making it up, you’re a hypochondriac etc.  The other standard reaction seems to be one of pain and shock – particularly I imagine if you were expecting a diagnosis to come with a treatment and a way of getting rid of the pain.

You may go into denial and push through and try and ignore the pain and fatigue you’re experiencing because you subconsciously don’t want to stop and think about what this means for the rest of your life.

You are also probably more used to acute illness or injury and suddenly are faced with something more severe that you’re expected to live with and to carry out all the normal living stuff with pain.

Pain and guilt

Pain wise, you have to adapt to living with pain and learn and experiment with what helps to relieve your pain.  You may also have to decide how to balance things in your life so that you relieve some pain but still have a life, or how much medication you use knowing that the side effects can reduce your quality of life.

Another way guilt manifests is the increased role in household jobs that your partner may have to take on, and in some cases, your partner may have to do some or all of your care.  There is also the guilt because your condition doesn’t just limit you, it limits your partners life.  If you used to go rock climbing together, you might not be able to any more and even if your partner continues rock climbing, dynamics have changed.

A very common way that guilt shows up is when you can’t do the things you feel you should be doing.  Note the words feel and should there.

For clarification, I am not saying you should feel guilty about not being able to do x or y in your home, just that these are thoughts and feelings that are common to people who have chronic pain.

Anger and Bargaining

I think this is probably the phase where you do a lot of googling and getting second, third and fourth opinions in the hope that the answers might change.  You might want to stamp you feet and shout “no fair” at the world.  You may get angry at medical professionals who tell you there is no cure.

You may become angry at those around you because they don’t know how to help you or are actually making things worse.  You may become angry at your body because it isn’t working as it should.  Or you may disconnect from your body and see it as something separate from you, something other that you can be angry at.

You may become frustrated because your future no longer looks the same and you don’t know what it will look like.  You may prioritise work over home life or get things really out of balance because you are hanging on to your old life with fingernails.

If you’re religious I can easily see that this is when you’d start bartering with your god. What did I do to deserve this? Why me?  These are ways that anger expresses itself in the context of chronic illness.  You may also bargain with your body – if you get me through x then I’ll rest etc.

There is also anger and feelings of loss (and depression) about losing the person you used to be or thought you were becoming.  If you had a great job, very well paid, that defined you, chronic illness might strip you of all of these aspects and leave you unsure about who you are now and how you’re going to meet the bills.

This stage feels like everything is out of your control.

Depression and loneliness

And when things are out of your control, you can’t do anything to change circumstances and can become despondent, giving in to how things are or feeling defeated by your pain.

If you feel your friends can’t understand or the pain is too high so you stop doing things you can very easily become literally isolated and lonely but there is also the emotional loneliness of feeling like the only person in the world who is dealing with this.

I’m stuck with this, life hurts, why bother trying to do anything…

I’ve written about friends and chronic pain before.

The upward turn

Very few people make depression and loneliness their permanent home.  Eventually, you rally.  Your body has an innate survival drive, a will to live which overrides the narrative so far.

You may start to seek out other people who have your condition and feel less alone or you may begin to invite your friends back into your life.  At rock bottom you have nowhere to go but up and it may take time to get there but you will.

Reconstruction and working through

Here you are starting to figure out who you are with pain.  This might be where you start to look for tips and techniques for getting dressed or equipment that could help with cooking.  This is a bit of a problem solving stage and the more problems you solve, the more you start to see what you can do instead of what you can’t.

This stage tends to be more energised than the previous stages, you have more motivation and are starting to have a clearer idea of the future – whilst also remembering that pain and chronic illness can be unpredictable.

Acceptance and hope

Acceptance does not mean that what has happened and what you are going through is ok, it means you are no longer struggling against it.  Acceptance lets you build strategies and coping mechanisms.  Acceptance means you know that you will have a flare up, you aren’t in denial about it, and so you can create a flare up plan.

In the previous stage you may not have quite come to terms with the idea that this is your life, you may not have accepted that flare ups may well happen but here, you know that things will change but that you have the strength to get through them.

Hope is a strange one.  I’ve heard people talk about hope as if it means there is a cure and there isn’t for EDS and many other conditions (this tends to come from people who don’t have chronic pain, especially medical professionals).  Hope for me means that there is a chance at a better quality of life and a way of living that fits with the pain rather than struggles against it.

I also want to add that in the context of chronic illness, hope can be wasted energy.  I was asked many times if I wanted to be able to swallow and I explained that yes, I do, but also I’m being realistic and I don’t think a magic wand is coming along.  This was then interpreted by medical professionals as me not wanting to get better when actually it was a case of not wanting to pin all my hopes on something that might never happen.  In some ways, hope is a twin to worry, neither change the outcome and both require a lot of energy and brain space.  To pin everything on hope can mean you spend your life seeing dr after dr, reading paper after paper trying to find a different answer and this isn’t something I find helpful.

I am not without hope but neither am I preoccupied by it.  Instead of future gazing, I chose to spend my energy and spoons on today.  And today there is no cure.

I am not an expert but I do live with chronic pain and I do know a lot of people who have chronic pain.  Whilst it manifests differently for different people, these are stages which are very common.

EDS Rehab

Some of you might know that I’ve just started a three week pain management programme to try and help me manage my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome.  Well, we had a rocky start and a few issues with the hotel but today is day three and things seem to be going a bit more smoothly.  The rest of the group are lovely and friendly which I think will really make a difference, particularly as the weeks go on.

Whilst I’m not going to be sharing everything we’ve been doing, there are a few things that I think other people with chronic pain might find helpful and some other info that you might want to know if you’re considering coming.

Hotel

First of all, there are two versions – one run in a hospital and the other in a hotel, mine is the hotel version so I can have care with me.  This meant that I was assigned an accessible twin room.  Thankfully I am able to walk a little way otherwise I think I’d have had to go home again…  The room is tiny, the twin beds are essentially one big bed and I can’t get my manual or electric chair to the bed.  There certainly isn’t space for transferring.  Ditto for the toilet and the shower is so tiny that anyone much bigger than me would struggle.  It does have a shower seat but when it’s down there’s no space for your legs…  It’s certainly been an intimate experience when my carer has showered me…

The rooms that the hospital use all seem to be on the lower floor and there is a wheelchair platform lift as opposed to a regular lift.  We used this once when we arrived and I think we broke it. No one asked how heavy my electric chair was and it was only when I was going up it in my manual yesterday that I noticed we were probably 100kg over the maximum weight…  This means that if I want to go to reception or the restaurant we have to go to the far end of the building and then out the fire exit, through the car park and back into reception.  This isn’t great but thankfully isn’t raining… Although the fire door gets locked from the inside at night so we have to arrange for someone to meet us there and let us in.  Last night we also discovered that a door between the main corridors and rooms and the fire exit gets locked at a certain time so we couldn’t get in that way… This poses questions about how I get out in a fire as it’s the only ramped fire escape… Questions that so far the hotel have been unable to answer…

Pain

Up to now we’ve done some one to one work with a physio, an OT and a psychologist and had some talks about what pain is, the psychological element of pain and such things. In one of these sessions, we were shown a really interesting Ted Talk which shows the role of the brain in interpreting pain:

This is not to say that the pain is “all in your head”, you are not making the pain up but your brain has an important role in pain.  As Moseley explains, your nerves send signals to your spinal cord which passes them onto the brain for interpretation.  It is here that our bodies decide whether something is a threat or not.

In people with chronic pain, the messenger system which conveys sensations to brain can become over sensitive and sends more messages to the brain about stimuli and sensations.  The spinal cord also becomes really good at hearing these messages so it picks up on quieter messages and hears them more loudly.

We’ve also been looking at how prior experiences, beliefs, culture and relationships affect how we feel pain and how we think about it.

One of the really interesting points was that when you are experiencing a pain flare up, your body reacts in a very similar way to how it would if you were being chased by a lion – flight or fight mode.  This explains why your temperature changes, why your heart races, why you can struggle to breathe etc when pain is high.

I’ve also been given a few different physio exercises to try and strengthen my weak muscles and stretch out the tighter ones which we’ve been practising in my room.  Of course this all means increased pain right now and fatigue but it’s different pain to my normal pain so I’m taking that as a good thing!  And I get to do hydro which is very exciting!

Pain scales are a pain in my…

One of the most frustrating things from my stay in hospital is when they asked about pain.  On a scale of one to ten, with ten being the worst pain imaginable, where would you rate yourself when you’re up and moving around?  And when you’re comfortable and resting?  And right now?

Arghhhhh… This question does not work for people with chronic pain.  As I wasn’t actually in for pain I didn’t put much thought into my answers especially after I (politely) challenged a nurse about the uselessness of me answering.  But had I been in for pain related stuff, how would I respond when the first half of that pain scale never really applies to me.  This means I lose nuance and nurses who don’t know what ehlers danlos is look at me funny when I say 5, 6 or 7 – my most common pain scores according to their scale.  I no longer look in pain when my pain is 7 or below.

Also, the expected result was that when I was moving around my pain would be higher than it is when I’m in bed.  But for me that’s often not the case.  I know how to read my body and know when I’m overdoing it and I stop.  Because most of the pain isn’t an instant thing, it’s not like I stand and immediately I’m in agony, I tend to be in more pain when I’ve stopped.  Some of this is adrenaline and some is that I’ve stopped before the pain peaks.

The other really frustrating part of it was hearing other people claim to be at a 10 when they were pretty much fully functional.  In my books, a 10 has you close to passing out or passed out.

But there are options out there for improving this quantitative measure of pain.

Firstly, do the basics and show a patient the pain scale with faces on, it gives a bit more context and helps the patient have a guide to consider.

Although again, for people with chronic pain, the scale shifts.  It takes a hell of a lot of pain to make me cry or even get close to tears these days.

Maybe go one further and use this one from Hyperbole and a Half:

There are also written pain scales which patients might find useful as they don’t just look at the pain but look at the impact of said pain:

0  Pain free
1  Very minor annoyance-occasional minor twinges
2  Minor annoyance-occasional
3  Annoying enough to be distracting
4  Can be ignored if you are really involved in your work, but still distracting,
5  Can’t be ignored for more than 30 minutes.
6  Can’t be ignored for any length of time, but you can still go to work and participate in social activities.
7  Make it difficult to concentrate, interferes with sleep, you can still function with effort
8  Physical activity severely limited. You can read and converse with effort. Nausea and dizziness may occur.
9  Unable to speak, crying out or moaning uncontrollable- pain makes you pass out
10  Unconscious. Pain makes you pass out.
As an aside, according to this particular scale, my pain is always 7 or above…
A similar version exists but with colour coding to help:
Again, I’m a 7 or above most of the time with this one and I regularly hit 8 in the night.. See how unhelpful they are for chronic pain?!
You can also personalise your own pain scale which might be helpful for taking to appointments which are about pain.  There’s a tool online which can help with this and I’d recommend looking at other pain scales as well to get a flavour for things.
There is work going into pain scales, at least in America and I’m hoping that work goes into how the NHS use them as well.  They are a useful tool but they need a lot more tweaking before they can be anywhere near accurate measures of a persons pain.

The ever wise and wonderful Jo Southall has a post on her blog about painscales which I’m considering printing off and handing to the pain clinic next time I go.  Every time I have to fill in the pain scale form and draw on an outline of a body where my pain is, here’s a hint, pretty much everywhere…

As Jo suggests in her blog, much more helpful questions are about how you are coping with your pain, how it is affecting your life and whether it is disrupting your day to day activities.  Not only does this give a clearer picture to the medical practitioner but it also means you can look at making adjustments which will ease those issues caused by pain and in turn you may well make the pain more manageable.

Disability and sexuality, part 1

I was on a train about a year ago, the first time I’d been on a train in my wheelchair. I was sat in the wheelchair section along with some guys off to a football match. It was ten in the morning and they’d been drinking. And were talkative. I ended up left alone (as far as I was aware – it turned out there was a women round the corner listening to this who only spoke up once they’d got off the train…) with them for the 22 minutes between York and Leeds. And they were awful. They completely invaded my space, leaning on my chair and many other things which I’m not going to go through. But then, basically out of nowhere, one of them asked if I could have sex what with being in that thing, insert wild gesturing towards my chair. What the f***?

I’d “known” them about ten minutes and now they wanted diagrams about my sex life. And felt it was completely fine to ask for them. Not ok. Way way way not ok. But I was alone with them and had no idea how far they were travelling and I couldn’t move to another part of the train.

So I handled it in the only way I felt safe, with humour and changing the subject. Inside I was fuming and wanted to have it out with them about how inappropriate it was but I felt too vulnerable. If they’d turned nasty, I’d have been stuck. Indeed, when they left one of them hugged me and the other full on kissed my lips. Again, not ok.

But… and I am in no way excusing their behaviour, society paints people as asexual so when they were faced with a young woman in a chair I suspect they genuinely couldn’t put two and two together. I suspect they’d have hit on anyone who was female and near them on the train but it just so happened that it was me and my disability. And I think it threw them through a loop.

Which is why we need to talk about disability and sexuality.

So, can disabled people have sex?

Yes.

Wait, you want more than a one word answer? I think you’re probably wanting to ask how disabled people have sex then. And the answer is long. Probably infinite. Because, like with abled bodied people, everyone likes different things and is capable of different things. Indeed the sex that a disabled person has will probably vary depending on the partner, like with abled bodied sex…

But isn’t it a bit rubbish?

No. Again, everyone enjoys different things and are able to do different things.

I think it’s important to remember that we have mental disabilities, sensory disabilities and physical disabilities and obviously they will all have a different impact on sex. Often the difficulties people have in understanding how disabled people have sex is with regards to physical disabilities. Issues around learning disabilities tend to focus more on before sex, in particular around things like consent. And people seem to on the whole forget about mental illness when talking about how disabled people have sex… FYI, depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses can impact on your sex life. Perhaps that’s a different blog post.

Go on then, how do you do it?

Firstly, what do you mean by sex? So many people are referring to penis in vagina penetration when they talk about sex. Which is so uncreative… I can’t have penetrative sex as I’ve discussed here previously but I still enjoy lots of other things. You just need to explore more, see what works for you and your partners. Kiss, cuddle, use sex toys, make use of the bed raiser, have strategically placed cushions…

And communicate. The odd grunt and groan here and there probably isn’t going to cut it – can you tell the difference between the “keep going that’s amazing you’re rocking my world” groan and the “shit, my hip just dislocated but I don’t want to say something and ruin the mood” groan? Make it sexy, make it dirty, make it intimate.

You might need to talk beforehand about some things – where are you in pain, where should I avoid touching you, what happens if…, is the bed or the floor or the bath best for you, how does your disability affect you when it comes to sex…

There might need to be another person involved for example to help you get undressed or to get you onto the bed etc.

And if things go off course, humour is helpful. Except if you’ve just accidentally knee-ed your male partner… Turns out that’s not so funny… Oops!

But other than that, it can be a lot like “normal” sex.

Sexuality and disability has information about sex with partners and masturbation including ideas for particular conditions etc. And talk to your professionals.  Some of them will be squeemish and not answer your questions or try and deter you from having sex but that’s their issue not yours.  Keep trying until you get the info you want.  Sexuality is part of who you are and a healthy sex life can be great for your overall wellbeing.  Plus, orgasms are apparently great for pain relief.

Have fun and stay safe!