Disability and sexual health

Note, this is primarily going to be about the experience of cis women as I know more about this right now and I feel that trans disabled people are likely to have some extra barriers.  And obviously there are many different disabilities and this post is going to focus on physical disabilities.  It is also important to note that some people have had great experiences, but it is a postcode lottery.

You would think that medical buildings would be one of the most accessible places in the UK, but the reality is shocking.  Being in hospital with a physical disability was horrendous, but that’s for another post, this one is about sexual health services.

A recent report from Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust found that:

  • 88% said it is harder for women with physical disabilities to attend or access cervical screening
  • 63% said that they have been unable to attend cervical screening because of their disability
  • 49% said that they have chosen not to attend cervical screening in the past for reasons such as previous bad experiences related to their disability or worries about how people might react.
  • 45% said that they felt their needs have been forgotten and 38% said that they feel the doctors or nurses don’t take their needs seriously

This is not ok.  Sexual health matters.  And it’s not just about cervical screening.  The issues at play with the smear test are also often found in STI testing.  All of this is putting women with disabilities in danger.

In terms of screening for breast cancer, the NHS website says:

“Mammography is a procedure that’s technically difficult. You have to be carefully positioned on the X-ray machine, and must be able to hold the position for several seconds.

This may not be possible for women with limited mobility in their upper bodies or who are unable to support their upper bodies unaided.

If you have a disability, your breast screening unit should be able to advise you if screening is technically possible, and on the most appropriate place to be screened. This will usually be at a static unit.

If a mammogram isn’t technically possible, you should still remain in the call and recall programme, as any increased mobility at a future date may make screening easier.

If a woman can’t be screened, she should be advised on breast awareness.”

And whilst I understand the physical limitations, it doesn’t feel like enough.  In the US, between 2001 and 2005, 75.4% of women without disabilities went for a mammogram, compared to 54.9% of those who have a disability.

Barriers to accessing sexual health services include, but are not limited to:

  • surgeries that are not wheelchair friendly – a shocking 63% of respondents to the Jo’s Trust survey said their GP was wheelchair accessible
  • a lack of hoists and adjustable beds
  • previous negative experiences – women with disabilities may have had more interaction with the medical community and bad experiences more generally can mean they are reluctant to go for screening.  It’s not uncommon for women to feel they aren’t listened to or taken seriously when they present with illness or disability and no one wants to subject themselves to more of that.
  • related to which is staff attitudes, and not seeing disabled women as sexual beings and hence seeing sexual health as a low priority.

“In some cases, women reported being told screening is too complex to arrange and have been told it is not possible or even asked to sign a waiver stating that they do not wish to receive screening.”
– Jo’s Trust

Attitudes and beliefs taint the way people are treated.  I’ve had GPs question why I wanted contraception and assume the only reason would be to stop my period.  This didn’t happen before I became disabled.  And if someone isn’t seen as sexual, then by extension they don’t need to access sexual health services.  This way of thinking can block innovative, or just common sense, ways of providing these services. 

These solutions might be home visits for people unable to leave their bed, buying a hoist for the GP practice or referring people to a hospital where there are appropriate facilities.  It could be having appointments which allow for women with disabilities needing longer or it could just be better training.  Sometimes it might be as basic as having an accessible GP practice which really shouldn’t be a big ask.  And sometimes it might be even simpler and be a case of including access information on the website.  I checked out the online information for my nearest sexual health clinic and there is no mention of access or blue badge parking and that in itself is a barrier than can be easily and cheaply overcome.

Other good practice ideas include having staff that are flexible, that can problem solve and who want to work with the patient to find out what works for them.  It’s possible extra reassurance may help, or a “we’ll try it and see what happens and go from there” attitude.  For some women, going in and seeing the space may help them to work out adaptations with the staff beforehand.  It might also help to have another professional on hand to help.

There are other sexual health barriers that disabled people face, for example, if someone has limited use of their hands, how can their check their breasts/testicles for lumps?  Which can make the NHS advice for women who can’t have mammograms that bit more difficult… and certainly adds to the following horrific statistic:

“Disabled women don’t have the same access to screening for breast and genealogical cancers as non-disabled women, and are up to three times as likely to die of breast cancer.”
Disability Horizons

Unfortunately, this tends to mean the onus is on the woman to keep pushing for screening and be their own advocate… And until things change, one of the most important things we can do is make people aware of the issues and keep talking about them.  Hence this blog post!

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EDS and drinking, take two

Four or so years ago I wrote a blog post about EDS and drinking and felt it was time for an update!

What are the issues with EDS and drinking…

  • you may not be able to swallow or have a limited swallow.  In my case I can drink some things and not others.  Generally when people can’t swallow liquids very well they are advised to try thicker drinks. In my case this concept is reversed, I can’t drink thick drinks but can do water and squash and thin liquids.  I also can’t drink anything with sugar in.  No idea why this is the case but wanted to mention in case it helps someone else identify a pattern in their own swallowing.
  • you may not be able to lift a drinking vessel
  • you may not be able to open a bottle with your hands or a sports cap with your teeth
  • you may have a tendency to spill or drop drinks
  • you may need to drink more than the average person to manage POTS

What are the solutions?

Contigo Autoseal are still my go to for hot drinks and I still haven’t had a problem with the flask mentioned in my first post about this subject!  They have a couple of designs so it’s worth having a think about what will be best for you.  I find the ones without handles easier but the ones with handles do have locks for added security.  The button you press to open the mouth bit is fairly easy to press but not so easy it’ll get pressed in your bag.  You can also get a replacement lid if you ever need to so you won’t need to throw the whole thing away.

Note of caution: your drink will stay hot for hours. If you want to be able to drink it soon, add some cold water!

Straw wise, you’ve now got a range of options which is amazing!  There is lots of advice out there now in response to the straw bans but I find this from @rollwthepunches particularly helpful:

straw

Hopefully it will help you think through your options.  Personally I use metal straws for cold drinks and I have a little pouch that I take out with one in so my bag doesn’t get wet after use.  I also take out straws which are made of plastic designed for hot drinks, a bit like these from Serephina’s Kitchen.  Note, don’t use the metal ones for hot drinks!!!

I’ve tried glass straws and liked them for drinking wine – it felt classier than using plastic or metal – but my carers ended up breaking them all.  All of these can be hard to clean if you have hand issues so do consider that as well.  Some can go in the dishwasher and this might be something to think about if you don’t have someone who can help you clean them.

When it comes to cold drinks, I get through ridiculous amounts of squash and diet fizzy drinks in a day.  I’m talking 5 to 6 litres a day.  Obviously this means I don’t leave the house without a bottle and that bottle is one from Hydrate for Health.  It pops in the side pocket of my wheelchair bag and the long straw means it reaches round the chair and clips onto my coat or skirt or whatever.  Without it, I’d be asking my carers to open a drink every two seconds…  I also use it overnight.  It hooks onto the trolley by my bed and means I can easily drink when in bed.  I can even drink laying down, all I have to do is move my arm!  You can also buy replacement bits which is great – I have two bottles and have had them for years now but from time to time I need a new clip or straw and I like that I can get them separately.

At the other end of the size spectrum I have a Contingo Autoseal water bottle which is a mere 300ml and has been to Cambodia and back with me.  When I was on the plane, I got it refilled with water and hence didn’t have to bother with plastic cups.  I have absolutely no issues with it and, like my flask, have had it for a number of years now!

During the day I like to drink fizzy drinks and the hydrate for health doesn’t really work for that so I use those plastic cups with lids and straws.  You can find them in bargain home stores and have grown in popularity over the last few years so are fairly easy to find.  If you don’t know what I’m talking about, look at this one from amazon but note that you can normally get them for less than £3.

Safe Sip drink covers can another great product and can be used on wine glasses! They are easy to use and small enough to carry with you if you’re going out.  Pop them in a little pouch with your straw!

EDS Rehab

Some of you might know that I’ve just started a three week pain management programme to try and help me manage my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome.  Well, we had a rocky start and a few issues with the hotel but today is day three and things seem to be going a bit more smoothly.  The rest of the group are lovely and friendly which I think will really make a difference, particularly as the weeks go on.

Whilst I’m not going to be sharing everything we’ve been doing, there are a few things that I think other people with chronic pain might find helpful and some other info that you might want to know if you’re considering coming.

Hotel

First of all, there are two versions – one run in a hospital and the other in a hotel, mine is the hotel version so I can have care with me.  This meant that I was assigned an accessible twin room.  Thankfully I am able to walk a little way otherwise I think I’d have had to go home again…  The room is tiny, the twin beds are essentially one big bed and I can’t get my manual or electric chair to the bed.  There certainly isn’t space for transferring.  Ditto for the toilet and the shower is so tiny that anyone much bigger than me would struggle.  It does have a shower seat but when it’s down there’s no space for your legs…  It’s certainly been an intimate experience when my carer has showered me…

The rooms that the hospital use all seem to be on the lower floor and there is a wheelchair platform lift as opposed to a regular lift.  We used this once when we arrived and I think we broke it. No one asked how heavy my electric chair was and it was only when I was going up it in my manual yesterday that I noticed we were probably 100kg over the maximum weight…  This means that if I want to go to reception or the restaurant we have to go to the far end of the building and then out the fire exit, through the car park and back into reception.  This isn’t great but thankfully isn’t raining… Although the fire door gets locked from the inside at night so we have to arrange for someone to meet us there and let us in.  Last night we also discovered that a door between the main corridors and rooms and the fire exit gets locked at a certain time so we couldn’t get in that way… This poses questions about how I get out in a fire as it’s the only ramped fire escape… Questions that so far the hotel have been unable to answer…

Pain

Up to now we’ve done some one to one work with a physio, an OT and a psychologist and had some talks about what pain is, the psychological element of pain and such things. In one of these sessions, we were shown a really interesting Ted Talk which shows the role of the brain in interpreting pain:

This is not to say that the pain is “all in your head”, you are not making the pain up but your brain has an important role in pain.  As Moseley explains, your nerves send signals to your spinal cord which passes them onto the brain for interpretation.  It is here that our bodies decide whether something is a threat or not.

In people with chronic pain, the messenger system which conveys sensations to brain can become over sensitive and sends more messages to the brain about stimuli and sensations.  The spinal cord also becomes really good at hearing these messages so it picks up on quieter messages and hears them more loudly.

We’ve also been looking at how prior experiences, beliefs, culture and relationships affect how we feel pain and how we think about it.

One of the really interesting points was that when you are experiencing a pain flare up, your body reacts in a very similar way to how it would if you were being chased by a lion – flight or fight mode.  This explains why your temperature changes, why your heart races, why you can struggle to breathe etc when pain is high.

I’ve also been given a few different physio exercises to try and strengthen my weak muscles and stretch out the tighter ones which we’ve been practising in my room.  Of course this all means increased pain right now and fatigue but it’s different pain to my normal pain so I’m taking that as a good thing!  And I get to do hydro which is very exciting!

Things which make my day easier

Someone recently found my blog by looking for “ehlers danlos can’t open jars” and I hope they found some help (try dycem jar and bottle openers).  I wrote a post in 2014 (2014, can you believe it?!) with some tips for stuff which really helps me. Anyway, a lot has changed since then so I wanted to write an updated version.

Collection of drinking vessels
a collection of my cups, a cup cover and one of my hot drink straws

If you find this helpful, do check out the 2014 post as it all still holds up.

  • Tablet and tablet stand – these were included in my last post and I still love my tablet and use it so so often throughout the day.  It’s my contact to the world.  It’s my books and my storytellers.  It’s my calendar.  It’s my notebook.  It’s my teacher.  It’s my alarm clock.  It’s my tv.
  • Pillows – find pillows that work for you.  I have two standard bed pillows and a, rather pricey but worth it, U shaped pillow.  It’s filled with beans so it squishes and my shoulders have dislocated a lot less since I got it as they are now supported at night.
  • Mattress raiser – I got mine through the local council.  Basically it goes under your mattress and allows you to raise the head end of the bed like a profiling bed would using a remote.  This makes it so much easier for me to get in and out of bed, more comfortable when I’m in bed but wanting to sit up and it’s easier for my carers to get me out.  The combination of this plus my mattress topper means that I have king size sheets for my double bed.  Much easier for my carers to get on and less likely to twang off in the night!
  • Bed wedges – there are lots of different options, I have one which supports my knees and ankles
  • Duvet raiser thingy which keeps the duvet off my feet (the weight of my not very heavy duvet is enough to hurt my ankles and dislocate my toes).  I have my thingy attached to my bed using a strap which goes round the mattress and I have a blanket pegged over the top, round the sides and the end of the bed so my toesies don’t get chilly!
  • Overbed table – I got mine for a bargain price of £3 at my local second hand furniture place.  It gives me a place to put things like meds, my tablet etc so that they’re essentially in my bed but not going to fall prey to my tossing and turning.  I have a tray on top of mine which has the advantage of making it look less clinical whilst the edges stop things falling off.
  • Key safe – this means that my friends and carers can let themselves into my flat if they know the code to the key safe.  In my old flat I kept my spare keys in a combination lock locked shed.  It means I don’t have to get out of bed to let my carers in and it’s there in an emergency so other people can get into my flat.
  • Cutlery – I can now only use my bent spoon to eat, anything else causes too much pain or is impossible.  You may find spoons easier than using a knife and fork or maybe just need a thicker handle.
  • Plastic crockery – this is lighter and obviously less breakable.  I have some nice bits from Cath Kidston, paperchase and I got some in the BHS closing down sale.
  • Cups and drinking accessories (what you don’t accessorise your drinking? how last season are you…?!)
  • Trolley – this lets me move a lot of stuff from room to room at once, reducing the need for multiple trips as well as reducing risks of dropping things and lessening the pain in my hands
  • Plug pulls – a little bit of plastic which attaches to your plugs to make them easier to pull out, genius!
  • My pouch – I love my pouch.  It holds my tablet, my money, my keys etc.  And because it isn’t an actual bag, it squishes down beside me in the wheelchair so I can get to the important stuff.
  • Hairbands – especially wide fabric ones and headscarves are perfect for bad hair days, weeks when you’ve not managed to wash it etc.  And dry shampoo is also helpful here!

I’ve included links to help illustrate what I mean.  I don’t get any money from the companies and obviously you should shop around and find what works for you.  You may also be able to get some of these things through your local community equpiment service (in the UK at least).

 

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When sex hurts: Sex and chronic pain

The post is looking at when sex exacerbates existing non sex related pain rather than pain caused purely by sex.  Although not discussed here, changes to appearance, self esteem etc will all impact on your psychological wellbeing which can then impact on your sex life.

Chronic pain can be distracting, it hurts obviously and it can impact heavily on your life. Including your sex life…  Being in pain all the time does not make you (or at least me) feel sexy.

I wanted to do a post specifically about pain because I think the impact pain has on sex can be different to other disabilities. My first point would be to talk to your doctors… However,  I know that that isn’t always all that helpful… indeed, the NHS seems a bit lacking for in depth support…  (but yay, they have something, I guess)

I don’t have a magic wand to make sex with chronic pain easier but having sex can help with the pain so it’s worth a try, right?!  Orgasms cause endorphins to flood your body which helps with pain relief.

In no particular order, here’s some things to consider:

  • Communication – talk to your partner, its ok to be worried about the impact of sex on your pain, particularly if you’ve been avoiding it. Talk about where the pain is worse right now, should your partner avoid touching parts of you today etc
  • A lot of conditions fluctuate, make sure your partner understands this; being able to do something one day doesn’t mean you can do it the next.
  • Plan ahead. Unlike the movies, sex doesn’t always have to be spontaneous.  There are so many reasons why that doesn’t work such as children, working unusual hours, carers etc.  And if it helps, you can try and schedule in some rest time before hand and recovery time afterwards.
  • Find out what the best time of day is for you in terms of low pain, higher energy levels and higher libido
  • If being touched is painful (or even if it isn’t!), use none contact ways to arouse each other eg sexting, phone sex, talking flirty or dirty, mutual masturbation, pornography, erotic literature or try light touch such as feathers and silk
  • Massage is another way of being intimate, just be careful with painful joints, muscles etc
  • If your hands are in pain, try using your tongue
  • Warming the bed beforehand eg with an electric blanket may ease some of your pain
  • Sex toys might be easier for you and your partner
  • Cushions – well placed cushions can be invaluable! Think propping up hips etc
  • Where are you having sex? Would your wheelchair or riser recliner chair or electronic bed be more comfortable or in the water?
  • There’s also the impact of pain meds, they can decrease your libido, and you need to make sure you are on the right meds for you at the right dosage. If your pain isn’t controlled at all then of course sex will be harder
  • If your partner is your carer and you need help getting changed or into position, maybe you could ask someone else to get you ready or make the care into the foreplay.
  • Go long and slow or short and sweet, whatever works better for you
  • Have a think about what positions are best depending on where your pain is etc
  • Try not to stay in the same position for a long time if this causes you pain
  • Depending on where things are in your sex life, go back to basics with date nights, flirting, kisses, holding hands, cuddles…
  • Muscle relaxants, a warm bath, massage, a glass of wine might all aid things by relaxing you and your muscles
  • If something doesn’t feel good, say something.  Don’t assume your groans are conveying the right message! Maybe even have a safe word or be clear that stop means stop right away.
  • Use Google, look up good sex positions for ehlers danlos or whatever you have
  • edited to add, lube, lube is good

None of this is going to be a quick and easy solution unfortunately…

I’d really like to hear from you if you’ve got any more tips.

I’d also suggest popping over to The Hippy Geek who has joined two beds together so she can have an adjustable bed and still share a bed with her husband which I think is awesome*!

*be in no doubt here, as awesome as the idea is, if you ever end up in a relationship with me, you’ll be in the spare room! I love my double bed and all it’s very specifically arranged accessories and I’m not giving up my middle of the night internet for anyone!

Disability and sexuality, part 1

I was on a train about a year ago, the first time I’d been on a train in my wheelchair. I was sat in the wheelchair section along with some guys off to a football match. It was ten in the morning and they’d been drinking. And were talkative. I ended up left alone (as far as I was aware – it turned out there was a women round the corner listening to this who only spoke up once they’d got off the train…) with them for the 22 minutes between York and Leeds. And they were awful. They completely invaded my space, leaning on my chair and many other things which I’m not going to go through. But then, basically out of nowhere, one of them asked if I could have sex what with being in that thing, insert wild gesturing towards my chair. What the f***?

I’d “known” them about ten minutes and now they wanted diagrams about my sex life. And felt it was completely fine to ask for them. Not ok. Way way way not ok. But I was alone with them and had no idea how far they were travelling and I couldn’t move to another part of the train.

So I handled it in the only way I felt safe, with humour and changing the subject. Inside I was fuming and wanted to have it out with them about how inappropriate it was but I felt too vulnerable. If they’d turned nasty, I’d have been stuck. Indeed, when they left one of them hugged me and the other full on kissed my lips. Again, not ok.

But… and I am in no way excusing their behaviour, society paints people as asexual so when they were faced with a young woman in a chair I suspect they genuinely couldn’t put two and two together. I suspect they’d have hit on anyone who was female and near them on the train but it just so happened that it was me and my disability. And I think it threw them through a loop.

Which is why we need to talk about disability and sexuality.

So, can disabled people have sex?

Yes.

Wait, you want more than a one word answer? I think you’re probably wanting to ask how disabled people have sex then. And the answer is long. Probably infinite. Because, like with abled bodied people, everyone likes different things and is capable of different things. Indeed the sex that a disabled person has will probably vary depending on the partner, like with abled bodied sex…

But isn’t it a bit rubbish?

No. Again, everyone enjoys different things and are able to do different things.

I think it’s important to remember that we have mental disabilities, sensory disabilities and physical disabilities and obviously they will all have a different impact on sex. Often the difficulties people have in understanding how disabled people have sex is with regards to physical disabilities. Issues around learning disabilities tend to focus more on before sex, in particular around things like consent. And people seem to on the whole forget about mental illness when talking about how disabled people have sex… FYI, depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses can impact on your sex life. Perhaps that’s a different blog post.

Go on then, how do you do it?

Firstly, what do you mean by sex? So many people are referring to penis in vagina penetration when they talk about sex. Which is so uncreative… I can’t have penetrative sex as I’ve discussed here previously but I still enjoy lots of other things. You just need to explore more, see what works for you and your partners. Kiss, cuddle, use sex toys, make use of the bed raiser, have strategically placed cushions…

And communicate. The odd grunt and groan here and there probably isn’t going to cut it – can you tell the difference between the “keep going that’s amazing you’re rocking my world” groan and the “shit, my hip just dislocated but I don’t want to say something and ruin the mood” groan? Make it sexy, make it dirty, make it intimate.

You might need to talk beforehand about some things – where are you in pain, where should I avoid touching you, what happens if…, is the bed or the floor or the bath best for you, how does your disability affect you when it comes to sex…

There might need to be another person involved for example to help you get undressed or to get you onto the bed etc.

And if things go off course, humour is helpful. Except if you’ve just accidentally knee-ed your male partner… Turns out that’s not so funny… Oops!

But other than that, it can be a lot like “normal” sex.

Sexuality and disability has information about sex with partners and masturbation including ideas for particular conditions etc. And talk to your professionals.  Some of them will be squeemish and not answer your questions or try and deter you from having sex but that’s their issue not yours.  Keep trying until you get the info you want.  Sexuality is part of who you are and a healthy sex life can be great for your overall wellbeing.  Plus, orgasms are apparently great for pain relief.

Have fun and stay safe!

Personal strategies for living a good life

One of the last sections of my Future Learn course is around personal strategies for living a good life with an impairment.

“Because disability studies collects a huge range of impairments, each of which are experienced differently in everyday life and have different impairment effects, there is no end to the personal strategies people with impairments use to support a good life.”

That being said, it does suggest some examples; community, the spoon theory as a means of helping people understand and mindfulness.

I started to respond with my own personal strategies but ran out of space so I thought I’d carry on over here and invite your ideas and strategies as well.

Community

Online community is a huge way I cope with things. I blog and use twitter to “meet” other people with my condition which helps me feel understood as well as having people to offer helpful tips such as what bottle opener works best. These friends also understand the impact of society and it can be so helpful to know you aren’t alone in dealing with things such as access issues or abuse. Indeed, it helps me to realise that I am not the problem, if it’s happening to other people then it’s not about me personally. I could rationally reach that conclusion but the individualistic nature of western society can really make things feel personal.

Pacing

Pacing is one of my really important strategies. If you have chronic pain or fatigue, do look it up. It’s the idea of doing something for slightly less time then breaking then going back to it rather than doing a lot of something all at once and then paying for it.

Humour

Humour is essential. Admittedly, my humour tends to be dry, sarcastic and biting but there you go.  The first day I had care we got into a bit of a mess getting changed. It, like a lot of my life, is undignified and humour can make it easier to cope. It can still get me down of course, it just means I’m not always down about it.

Without a degree of humour, it’s hard to let someone else wash you intimately.  It can become tense and awkward if you let it.

Action for change

This is something mentioned by one of my fellow students.  Instead of coming up with personal strategies to navigate a world which isn’t designed for us, we should challenge that society.  And I think this is really important and there are lots of ways of doing it, from raising awareness by sharing your experiences to hanging off a bridge in your wheelchair.

A moan

It’s not a very fashionable thing but having a bit of a moan from time to time can help.  Don’t get stuck there but getting frustrations off your chest can be cathartic.  And can help with awareness raising!

Support groups

This should probably be included with community but there’s something more specific about a group of people who are experiencing the same things as you.  With that shared knowledge, you can problem solve, you can suggest ideas which have helped you, you become more aware of shared issues and can come up with ways to address them.

Netflix days

Sometimes, we need a down day.  And if that’s watching netflix in bed, do it.  I remember a conversation with a friend who has mental health issues where she was describing how helpful it can be to give yourself a day to indulge in things.  So long as you have a day or time in mind to force yourself back out of it.  My fear of giving in and not getting out of bed has long been that I’d just never get out again.  So this ensures that won’t happen (sort of) whilst giving you the crash time you might need.

Acceptance

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference

– Reinhold Niebuhr

I’m not religious or in AA but the sentiment expressed in the serenity prayer is one that I think is important when it comes to coping with long term illness and disability.  There are lots of frustrating things I can’t change – I can’t make myself better for example – and getting stuck in a place where I’m angry about it isn’t helpful (there’s a grieving process around coming to terms with acquired disability which is fine, but it’s not a place that’s nice to get stuck in).  It’s taken a long time but I feel I’ve mostly accepted my illness and that’s so much better for my mental health and wellbeing.  And then there are things I can (attempt to) change such as my old workplace being inaccessible.  And this is a much healthier way to use my frustrations and anger.

Creativity

Whether it’s a page in my art journal or a bit of work on a canvas, creating things helps me in many ways.  It’s a distraction from my pain, it gives me a sense of achievement, it’s a way of expressing myself and probably helps in other ways that I’m not really aware of.

image

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What strategies do you have?