EDS: What to do with a dislocation

I’ve been meaning to write this for ages but a friend asking me advice about her not-quite-in-the-right-place joint reminded me.

Please note, none of the following should replace medical advice and certainly isn’t relevant if you don’t have EDS.  If you don’t have EDS and think you may have dislocated a joint, go to A&E.

If you have EDS and are prone to full or partial dislocations then the following information may be helpful.  It came from a physio who works with people with EDS.

If you lose feeling in the limb or it gets cold or starts turning blue, then seek emergency help.

If not, then a good rule of thumb is that if it came out, it will probably go back in again.  But first the muscles must relax and this is what you can work on.  If you go to A&E, then they are likely to anaesthetise your muscles, then force the joint back.  Once the anaesthetic wears off, your muscles will then freak out and it’s likely they’ll pull your joint out again.  This can get you trapped in a vicious cycle which can result in long term deterioration.

Instead of force, try a gentler approach.  Everything I’m suggesting is with the aim of relaxing those muscles.

  • If you have pain medication, take it as prescribed, no need to be a martyr.
  • Take a few deep breaths; panic will make things worse.  If you panic, you increase your body’s stress which can lead to spasms which can make things worse.
  • If you have relaxation techniques, use them.  If not, maybe make a note to look into them when this is over.
  • Support the joint with pillows or a sling as this will take the pressure off the muscles.
  • Heat can help to relax the muscles, as can gentle massage – but only if you can tolerate it.  Remember we are trying to relax here, anything that adds to your pain or stress levels is unhelpful.
  • Use distraction.  This aims to reduce any panic or stress you might have about the joint.

But all of this will take time, that might be hours, it might be a few days.  And at some point you may still need to seek medical help.

Afterwards, try and see a physio to get advice on exercises that might be able to help strengthen or at least maintain the muscle tone around the joint.  You want to try and prevent it from happening again, so looking at what you were doing at the time may also be useful.  Can you do things differently in the future?  Can you get some equipment that might take some of the strain?  It might not have been the physical action itself either, it could be that you were particularly stressed or tired and that made you more susceptible to an injury.