EDS and drinking, take two

Four or so years ago I wrote a blog post about EDS and drinking and felt it was time for an update!

What are the issues with EDS and drinking…

  • you may not be able to swallow or have a limited swallow.  In my case I can drink some things and not others.  Generally when people can’t swallow liquids very well they are advised to try thicker drinks. In my case this concept is reversed, I can’t drink thick drinks but can do water and squash and thin liquids.  I also can’t drink anything with sugar in.  No idea why this is the case but wanted to mention in case it helps someone else identify a pattern in their own swallowing.
  • you may not be able to lift a drinking vessel
  • you may not be able to open a bottle with your hands or a sports cap with your teeth
  • you may have a tendency to spill or drop drinks
  • you may need to drink more than the average person to manage POTS

What are the solutions?

Contigo Autoseal are still my go to for hot drinks and I still haven’t had a problem with the flask mentioned in my first post about this subject!  They have a couple of designs so it’s worth having a think about what will be best for you.  I find the ones without handles easier but the ones with handles do have locks for added security.  The button you press to open the mouth bit is fairly easy to press but not so easy it’ll get pressed in your bag.  You can also get a replacement lid if you ever need to so you won’t need to throw the whole thing away.

Note of caution: your drink will stay hot for hours. If you want to be able to drink it soon, add some cold water!

Straw wise, you’ve now got a range of options which is amazing!  There is lots of advice out there now in response to the straw bans but I find this from @rollwthepunches particularly helpful:

straw

Hopefully it will help you think through your options.  Personally I use metal straws for cold drinks and I have a little pouch that I take out with one in so my bag doesn’t get wet after use.  I also take out straws which are made of plastic designed for hot drinks, a bit like these from Serephina’s Kitchen.  Note, don’t use the metal ones for hot drinks!!!

I’ve tried glass straws and liked them for drinking wine – it felt classier than using plastic or metal – but my carers ended up breaking them all.  All of these can be hard to clean if you have hand issues so do consider that as well.  Some can go in the dishwasher and this might be something to think about if you don’t have someone who can help you clean them.

When it comes to cold drinks, I get through ridiculous amounts of squash and diet fizzy drinks in a day.  I’m talking 5 to 6 litres a day.  Obviously this means I don’t leave the house without a bottle and that bottle is one from Hydrate for Health.  It pops in the side pocket of my wheelchair bag and the long straw means it reaches round the chair and clips onto my coat or skirt or whatever.  Without it, I’d be asking my carers to open a drink every two seconds…  I also use it overnight.  It hooks onto the trolley by my bed and means I can easily drink when in bed.  I can even drink laying down, all I have to do is move my arm!  You can also buy replacement bits which is great – I have two bottles and have had them for years now but from time to time I need a new clip or straw and I like that I can get them separately.

At the other end of the size spectrum I have a Contingo Autoseal water bottle which is a mere 300ml and has been to Cambodia and back with me.  When I was on the plane, I got it refilled with water and hence didn’t have to bother with plastic cups.  I have absolutely no issues with it and, like my flask, have had it for a number of years now!

During the day I like to drink fizzy drinks and the hydrate for health doesn’t really work for that so I use those plastic cups with lids and straws.  You can find them in bargain home stores and have grown in popularity over the last few years so are fairly easy to find.  If you don’t know what I’m talking about, look at this one from amazon but note that you can normally get them for less than £3.

Safe Sip drink covers can another great product and can be used on wine glasses! They are easy to use and small enough to carry with you if you’re going out.  Pop them in a little pouch with your straw!

EDS and drinking

A while back, the lovely Beth of Mermaid in Disguise wrote about Cute Cups for Crappy Hands. And crappy hands being a subject I know a lot about, I accidentally wrote an essay in the comments section…

So I thought it would be useful to share the information here as well.

Collection of drinking vessels

What are the issues with EDS and drinking…

  • you may not be able to swallow. thankfully i can but my sister can’t and I’m afraid I’m not best placed to advise on this one.
  • you may not be able to lift a drinking vessel
  • you may not be able to open a bottle with your hands or a sports cap with your teeth
  • you may have a tendency to spill or drop drinks

Hot drinks

Contigo Autoseal are my go to for hot drinks (the site is american but there are UK retailers, it’s just an easier way to see the whole range on their site).  I’ve never had a spill and the button to open the mouth bit is fairly easy to press but not so easy it will spill in your bag. They’ve got a few designs so you can think about what will work best for your hands.  And they come in a range of colours as well!

Note of caution: your drink will stay hot for hours. If you want to be able to drink it soon, add some cold water!

Hot Straws are also ace for when you’re out and about.  They mean you can order a hot drink and not have to lift the cup, just pop in your straw and go.  The straws also fit into most takeaway cups (through the little mouth bit) which is extra helpful.

Second note of caution: Using a regular straw with a hot drink is not recommended. There are risks around the chemicals used to make them which are then released when they get warm.  Also increased risk of burning yourself.

Cold drinks

I get through ridiculous amounts of squash in a day.  Maybe 2 litres whilst I’m at work and 2 litres when I get home. Way above the recommended 2 litres per day.  And I can’t make my own juice or fill up my own bottle.  So I need a big bottle to get me through the time when there is no one here, which I wouldn’t be able to lift.  My first thought was that I’d have to have millions of small drinks all lined up for me… But then, through the powers of the internet, I came across Hydrate for Health.  And without wanting to seem dramatic, it has changed my life!

I can drink laying down; I just hook it into the walker I have by my bed or chair, clip or drape the end over another part of the walker and I have a litre of juice in my reach. I also have one one my desk at work. People only need to fill up my juice twice a day at work say instead of every hour and no spills.  Pop it in your wheelchair bag and feed the tube round the side and you’ve got instant access to your drink whilst you’re in your chair!

As you can tell, I love it, and I think it’s probably a good moment to mention I am not on commission!  I don’t receive anything from the products I recommend here, I’m just a satisfied customer.

Also Contingo Autoseal do juice bottles in a range of sizes and are ace.  Mine is 400ml which makes it lighter than carrying a coke bottle etc and went all the way to Cambodia with me.  It meant that whenever I was offered a (non fizzy) drink, either in restaurants or on the plane, I could pass over my bottle and not have to worry about plastic cups etc.  They also come in a range of colours and if you venture into the children’s section there are also some cool patterns as well.

And not forgetting alcohol…

Safe Sip drink covers can be used on wine glasses and are easy to use and small enough to carry with you if you’re going out.  I struggle with drinking from wine glasses so I drink wine from plastic beakers with a safe sip cover.

So that, folks, is how I manage to stay hydrated with EDS.  Do you have any other tips or favourite products?